U.S. Military Facts

Size:

Fireteam: 3 to 5 Soldiers

Squad: 9 to 10 Soldiers

Platoon: 16 to 44 Soldiers

Company: 62 to 190 Soldiers

Battalion: 300 to 1,000 Soldiers

Brigade: 3,000 to 5,000 Soldiers

Division: 10,000 to 15,000 Soldiers

Corps: 20,000 to 45,000 Soldiers

Source: Soldiers Almanac, January 2004

Active in Duty: 488,579 (72%)

In Reserve: 189,005 (28%)

Enlisted: 558,993 (83%)

Warrant Officers: 15,011 (2%)

Commissioned Officers: 103,580 (15%)

Source: FY05 Army Profile, September 2005

Ranks:

PRIVATE (PVT/PV2)
Lowest rank: a trainee who’s starting Basic Combat Training (BCT). Primary role is to carry out orders issued to them to the best of his/her ability. (PVT does not have an insignia) PRIVATE FIRST CLASS (PFC)
PV2s are promoted to this level after one year’or earlier by request of supervisor. Individual can begin BCT at this level with experience or prior military training. Carries out orders issued to them to the best of his/her ability.

 

SPECIALIST (SPC)
Can manage other enlisted Soldiers of lower rank. Has served a minimum of two years and attended a specific training class to earn this promotion. People enlisting with a four-year college degree can enter BCT as a Specialist.

CORPORAL (CPL)
The base of the Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO) ranks, CPLs serve as team leader of the smallest Army units. Like SGTs, they are responsible for individual training, personal appearance and cleanliness of Soldiers.

SERGEANT (SGT)
Typically commands a squad (9 to 10 Soldiers). Considered to have the greatest impact on Soldiers because SGTs oversee them in their daily tasks. In short, SGTs set an example and the standard for Privates to look up to, and live up to.

STAFF SERGEANT (SSG)
Also commands a squad (9 to 10 Soldiers). Often has one or more SGTs under their leadership. Responsible for developing, maintaining and utilizing the full range of his Soldiers’ potential.

SERGEANT FIRST CLASS (SFC)
Key assistant and advisor to the platoon leader. Generally has 15 to 18 years of Army experience and puts it to use by making quick, accurate decisions in the best interests of the Soldiers and the country.

MASTER SERGEANT (MSG)
Principal NCO at the battalion level, and often higher. Not charged with all the leadership responsibilities of a 1SG, but expected to dispatch leadership and other duties with the same professionalism.

FIRST SERGEANT (1SG)
Principal NCO and life-blood of the company: the provider, disciplinarian and wise counselor. Instructs other SGTs, advises the Commander and helps train all enlisted Soldiers. Assists Officers at the company level (62 to 190 Soldiers).

SERGEANT MAJOR (SGM)
SGMs serve as the chief administrative assistant for a headquarters unit of the Army, but the sphere of influence regarding leadership is generally limited to those directly under his charge. They are key enlisted members of staff elements at levels at Battalion or higher.

COMMAND SERGEANT MAJOR (CSM)
CSMs are the senior enlisted advisors to the commanding officer. They carry out policies and standards, and advise the commander on the performance, training, appearance, and conduct of enlisted soldiers. The CSM’s counsel is expected to be calm, settled and unequivocally accurate, but with an energy and enthusiasm that never wanes, even in the worst of times. A CSM is assignable to any level Battalion or higher.

SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY
There’s only one Sergeant Major of the Army. This rank is the epitome of what it means to be a Sergeant and oversees all Non-Commissioned Officers. Serves as the senior enlisted advisor and consultant to the Chief of Staff of the Army (a four-star General).

Warrant Officers:

WARRANT OFFICER 1 (WO1)
An officer appointed by the Secretary of the Army. WO1s are basic level, technically and tactically focused officers who perform the primary duties of technical leader, trainer, operator, manager, maintainer, sustainer, and advisor. WO1s primarily support levels of operations from team or detachment through battalion, requiring interaction with all soldier cohorts and primary staff

CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 2 (CW2)
An officer, commissioned by the President of the United States. CW2s are intermediate level technical and tactical experts who perform the primary duties of technical leader, trainer, operator, manager, maintainer, sustainer, and advisor. CW2s primarily support levels of operations from team or detachment through battalion, requiring interaction with all soldier cohorts and primary staff.

CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 3 (CW3)
An officer, commissioned by the President of the United States. CW3s are advanced-level technical and tactical experts who perform the primary duties of technical leader, trainer, operator, manager, maintainer, sustainer, integrator, and advisor. CW3s primarily support levels of operations from team or detachment through brigade, requiring interaction with all soldier cohorts and primary staff.

CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 4 (CW4)
An officer, commissioned by the President of the United States. CW4s are senior-level technical and tactical experts who perform the primary duties of technical leader, manager, maintainer, sustainer, integrator and advisor. They primarily support battalion, brigade, division, corps, and echelons above corps operations.

CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 5 (CW5)
An officer, commissioned by the President of the United States. CW5s are master-level technical and tactical experts who perform the primary duties of technical leader, manager, integrator, advisor, or any other particular duty prescribed by branch. CW5s primarily support brigade, division, corps, echelons above corps, and major command operations. CW5s have special WO leadership and representation responsibilities within their respective commands.

Main Officers:

SECOND LIEUTENANT (2LT)
Typically the entry-level rank for most Commissioned Officers. Leads platoon-size elements consisting of the platoon SGT and two or more squads (16 to 44 Soldiers).

FIRST LIEUTENANT (1LT)
A seasoned lieutenant with 18 to 24 months service. Leads more specialized weapons platoons and indirect fire computation centers. As a senior Lieutenant, they are often selected to be the Executive Officer of a company-sized unit (110 to 140 personnel).

CAPTAIN (CPT)
Commands and controls company-sized units (62 to 190 Soldiers), together with a principal NCO assistant. Instructs skills at service schools and combat training centers and is often a Staff Officer at the battalion level.

MAJOR (MAJ)
Serves as primary Staff Officer for brigade and task force command regarding personnel, logistical and operational missions.

LIEUTENANT COLONEL (LTC)
Typically commands battalion-sized units (300 to 1,000 Soldiers), with a CSM as principal NCO assistant. May also be selected for brigade and task force Executive Officer.

COLONEL (COL)
Typically commands brigade-sized units (3,000 to 5,000 Soldiers), with a CSM as principal NCO assistant. Also found as the chief of divisional-level staff agencies.

BRIGADIER GENERAL (BG)
Serves as Deputy Commander to the commanding general for Army divisions. Assists in overseeing the staff’s planning and coordination of a mission.

MAJOR GENERAL (MG)
Typically commands division-sized units (10,000 to 15,000 Soldiers).

LIEUTENANT GENERAL (LTG)
Typically commands corps-sized units (20,000 to 45,000 Soldiers).

GENERAL (GEN)
The senior level of Commissioned Officer typically has over 30 years of experience and service. Commands all operations that fall within their geographical area. The Chief of Staff of the Army is a four-star General.

GENERAL OF THE ARMY (GOA)
This is only used in time of War where the Commanding Officer must be equal or of higher rank than those commanding armies from other nations. The last officers to hold this rank served during and immediately following WWII.

Source: GoArmy.com

Vehicles and Equipment

Helicopters and UAVs

Apache Longbow
The Apache is the Army’s primary attack helicopter, and the AH-64D Longbow has been upgraded to make it even more effective. It can fly day or night in any weather conditions and see enemy targets miles away in full color while avoiding detection. Hellfire and Sidewinder missiles deliver maximum firepower.

Black Hawk
The UH-60 Black Hawk is the Army’s all-purpose assault and transport helicopter. It has the power and maneuverability for air assault, troop transport, aero-medical missions and light lifting. It can also be configured for electronic warfare and Special Operations missions.

Chinook
When the Army needs to move large numbers of Soldiers, ammunition or supplies, the CH-47D is our workhorse. This twin-turbine, tandem rotor helicopter is built for heavy lifting. And when reconfigured as the MH-47, the Chinook speeds our Special Forces Soldiers into difficult terrain on night missions.

Kiowa Warrior
It’s small, fast and maneuverable with large windows, making the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior perfect for both scouting and combat missions. Its thermal imaging and laser range-finding equipment handles aerial reconnaissance with ease. Stinger missiles and a .50 caliber machine gun make it a tough fighter.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles relieve Army pilots by taking over reconnaissance missions that are exceptionally hazardous or fatiguing. UAVs can fly through areas contaminated by chemical or biological weapons. And they can stay airborne far longer than aircraft with human pilots.

Tanks & Fighting Vehicles

M1 Abrams Tank
Since 1980, the M1 has been the Army’s principal combat tank. It delivers maximum firepower against heavily armed and heavily armored enemies while operating under all weather, climate and lighting conditions. Such variants as the M1A1 and M1A2 add nuclear/biological/chemical (NBC) survivability, advanced thermal sensors, and powerful computing upgrades.

M2/M3 Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV)
The BFV transports our Soldiers on the battlefield, lays down covering fire while they deploy, and defeats enemy tanks, armored vehicles and even attack helicopters. The M2 Infantry version takes on the enemy with maneuverability and firepower, while the M3 Cavalry version is optimized for reconnaissance and security missions.

Stryker
Agile, fast and strong, the Stryker is the Army’s newest transport/combat vehicle. A fleet of Strykers can quickly deploy a Combat Brigade, maneuvering nimbly in close urban terrain or providing covering fire out in the open. It can be customized for a wide variety of missions, like Medical Evacuation, Engineering Squad transport, and Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM) launches.

 If you have someone in your family or a friend that’s in the military, please post here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s